Thursday, 30 June 2016

A few of my favourite things

This came to mind when I saw this picture. Sound of music:



Raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens
Bright copper kettles and warm woollen mittens
Brown paper packages tied up with strings
These are a few of my favourite things




Notice the beautiful Black and White contrast in this picture

This one we call the Whipping position. It's a variation on John Norman's Gor Whipping position that has her hands below her:



"'Kneel to the whip', said Samos. Piteously she knelt, a slave girl. Her wrists were crossed under her, as though bound, her head was to the floor, the bow of her back was exposed. She shuddered. I had little doubt but that this slave knew well, and much feared, the disciplining kiss of the Gorean slave lash."

 Page 13 - Marauders of Gor

But I like this one better. Infinite much better. With the arms stretched, head on the floor, butt upwards to receive anything she cannot see. A buttplug? A spanking? Notice how beautiful the breasts rest on the ground...

Wednesday, 29 June 2016

See all, hear all, say nowt

Horen, zien en zwijgen is a very, very old Dutch proverb. In English, Hear no evil, See no evil and Speak no Evil in German Nichts (Böses) hören, sehen und sagen and in French Rien dire, rien voir, rien entendre (le mal). 
Hundreds years ago these three monkeys were introduced that are intertwined with this proverb. The monkeys are display is however very wrong: 



This is: Don't Hear, Don't See, Don't talk. Or this one:


In the Netherlands there are always monkeys that display the proverb, I don't know how that is in your country? I do know I like this one best with four rascals:


Tuesday, 28 June 2016

Tea time

This wonderful back and white picture reminded me of a painting by Manet...

Notice the head of the maid is bent just like statue behind her..


You know the one I meant, don't you? The boldness is the same, the nonchalance of the figurants are the same, the unsuspected nudity is the same...

Le Déjeuner sur l'herbe

Monday, 27 June 2016

Tie your heart at night to mine

Tie your heart at night to mine, love,
and both will defeat the darkness
like twin drums beating in the forest
against the heavy wall of wet leaves.

Night crossing: black coal of dream
that cuts the thread of earthly orbs
with the punctuality of a headlong train
that pulls cold stone and shadow endlessly.

Love, because of it, tie me to a purer movement,
to the grip on life that beats in your breast,
with the wings of a submerged swan,

So that our dream might reply
to the sky’s questioning stars
with one key, one door closed to shadow.

Pablo Neruda

Sunday, 26 June 2016

The sound of Silver

 I love Chello music. The Chello resonates in the soul. The deep sound really gets to me, you know from deep within.
But the instrument I love most is the viola da gamba. Johann Sebastian Bach wrote 3 viola da gamba sonata's. And in the project All of Bach Mieneke van der Velden (viola da gamba) and Benjamin Alard (harpsichord) play the  Sonata for viola da gamba in D major in or about 1737 (some people would like to travel to the future if time-travel would be possible, but I would like to go back to 1737, Leipzig, Germany, pretty please). One of the advantages of living in this time and age you can see all these wonderful recorderings, each a masterpiece, every Friday a new one at All of Bach.



The viola da gamba is the cry from the soul. If the soul could cry it would sound like the viola da gamba in the St. Matthew Passion, also from the project all of Bach (nr. 57 from the Saint Matthew Passion). No other instrument comes closer than the viola da gamba here in this wonderful, complex, beautiful music.

Saturday, 25 June 2016

It still hurts...





I give up on bitcoin. This is too damn volatile. Oh, never mind, this is the British Pound:


But refugees are welcome:


Alzheimer's Disease

Those of you who know me well knew where this "brain posts" would be leading to... My point of destination is Alzheimer disease. Alzheimer explained in just three minutes.


Friday, 24 June 2016

Sexism on the brain



I often come across some blog post and I so wish I could write like that. We always want what we cannot have, sigh.
The post I am referring to this time is Language: a feminist guide

It is a wonderful essay on the influences of "semi-scientific" views on the brain differences between men and women. Brain research is complex, and difficult to explain. And the writer is not very impressed with those new scientific researchers, I just have to quote her:
For every scientist doing her best to communicate the complexity of contemporary brain research, there are a hundred non-scientists—self-help gurus, life-coaches, marketing consultants—churning out what has been labelled ‘neurobollocks’, a species of discourse that purports to be scientific, but is actually, ‘self-help books dressed up in a lab coat’.
Then she wipes the floor with books like books that shows there is a "male and female brain", 
 and "classics of neurosexism" like Why Men Don’t Iron, Why Men Don’t Listen and Women Can’t Read Maps, or Men are from Mars, women are from Venus?
The writers are not as much interested in a well researched and well documented scientific article, but more into making a quick sell:
But what these writers also know is their audience. Readers who buy books with titles like Why Men Don’t Listen and Women Can’t Read Maps are not looking for a nuanced, scientific discussion of sex and gender. They’re looking for a story that confirms their beliefs about how men and women are different, and reassures them that men and women will always be different no matter how much feminists shout and scream. It’s not about the science, it’s about the politics. 
The point that ms. Debuk (feminist, linguist, writer) is making that there is not much scientific evidence in neuroscience that supports popular views on men and women. If that is true, I cannot say, I can only recommend her website as very interesting.


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